Three in four Britons will receive the Covid vaccine, including nearly nine out of ten elderly people, according to a survey by the Daily Mail.

Only 7 percent said they would not receive it under any circumstances. The poll also showed that a Pfizer breakthrough was the best news of the year for many – and as important as the fall of the Iron Curtain.

There was a cautionary note, however, with seven in ten feeling the lockdown restrictions should remain in place for now.

Four in ten said the prime minister and his political colleagues should get vaccinated first to prove it is safe.

The survey came as Matt Hancock revealed details of the “giant logistics operation” required to inoculate large sections of the population within weeks.

The Minister of Health said that the start of implementation “will give hope to millions of weapons this winter.”

The program will include general practitioners who deliver punches from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week and:

  • More than 1,200 indoor vaccination procedures, among others;
  • Possibly the creation of mass vaccination centers Even in gyms, football fields, shopping malls and libraries;
  • Command centers and pop-up facilities for stab delivery;
  • Mobile teams to visit the vulnerable and the elderly at home;
  • Bring in the army to help with logistics;
  • Invitations are sent via text and text messages as every wave qualifies for pollination.

Britain has requested 40 million doses of the Pfizer vaccine – which gave the world hope when it was announced on Monday that it is 90 per cent effective in preventing the virus.

Better results for another vaccine, the Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine, are expected within days.

Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at Oxford University, said yesterday that he is optimistic that he can bring life back to somewhere close to normal by spring if the roll-out is successful.

Another 532 coronavirus deaths were reported in the UK yesterday, the highest in a single day since May 12. 20,412 laboratory confirmed cases have also been recorded.

According to today’s Mail survey, the elderly, who are most at risk of the pandemic, are most enthusiastic about vaccination. A total of 86 percent of 65-year-olds would get it and only 2 percent would reject the blank.

Hopes of ending the most notorious disruption caused by the Covid virus were raised yesterday when the New York-based medical company Pfizer announced that its vaccine was 90 percent effective.

Hopes of ending the most notorious disruption caused by the Covid virus were raised yesterday when the New York-based medical company Pfizer announced that its vaccine was 90 percent effective.

Older adults are so keen to protect themselves from the virus that 56 percent will get the vaccine as soon as possible.

A total of 62 percent of all ages say they would encourage grandparents and elderly relatives to get the vaccine; 16 percent said they would not encourage them this way.

Of people between the ages of 35 and 44, who are at the lowest risk of contracting Covid, 63 percent said they would agree to be vaccinated.

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Women, who typically care more about personal health than men, are more wary of the safety of a potentially revolutionary injection produced by Pfizer and BioNtech.

They say it was not properly tested by a margin of 42 percent versus 33. In contrast, the men say it was checked properly by a margin of 39 percent versus 38.

The initial results were better than the researchers expected, and if confirmed, would make the vaccine much more effective than the vaccine for influenza, tuberculosis and human papillomavirus.

The initial results were better than the researchers expected, and if confirmed, would make the vaccine much more effective than the vaccine for influenza, tuberculosis and human papillomavirus.

Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at the University of Oxford, said yesterday that he is optimistic that he will be able to bring life back to somewhere near normal by spring if the roll-out is successful.

Sir John Bell, professor of medicine at the University of Oxford, said yesterday that he is optimistic that he will be able to bring life back to somewhere near normal by spring if the start of implementation is successful.

Reflecting the new mood of hope, 35 percent of respondents said they plan Christmas naturally.

“ People are optimistic, positive, relaxed, and happy about the vaccine news, ” said James Johnson of JL Partners, who interviewed 1,016 adults online yesterday for the survey. More than half of them say it is the best thing they’ve heard this whole year. Older adults are especially happy and most eager to get a vaccine.

But alongside this happy dash, there is also a caution. “Caution” is among the emotions that people feel; Almost half of the public is not sure the vaccine is safe, and people fear it has not been thoroughly tested yet.

They are optimistic but go for the level as well: they think it’s good news but want to go ahead carefully to make sure it is going well from here. People have been let down before by claims that the virus is gone.

Add to that one in five people who say they would not get a vaccine if it was available to them, and the government clearly still has work to do. The scientific race for the vaccine may be over, but the public relations campaign to build confidence in it and eventually get people to take it, has only just begun.

Overall, 74 percent would get the vaccine compared to just 11 percent who said they most likely wouldn’t and 7 percent said definitely not. There was little support for the “anti-vaccination” brigade accused of making wild and false claims about the risks of the COVID-19 vaccine – and other vaccines.

And 70 percent say they feel the activists are irresponsible.

But the survey reiterates the note of caution made by Mr Johnson and Mr Hancock in their response to the vaccine.

Three in four say that despite the breach, they believe the government’s approach should be one of “caution – things could go wrong.”