Recent analyzes of several studies have demonstrated that masks and hand and distance hygiene are effective in preventing infection and contracting COVID-19. Masks are especially useful, but vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 is essential.

The latest results of the meta-analysis were published in the British Medical Journal, including 72 studies conducted on the usefulness of basic infection-fighting health recommendations such as masks, social distancing and hand hygiene (washing and disinfection). They have shown that all of these protection methods are effective and reduce the risk of infection as well as COVID-19.

The best results are achieved using masks, especially in closed rooms, they reduce the risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 by 53%. Maintaining a physical distance reduces this risk by 25%.

The study authors and experts from Monash University and the University of Edinburgh argued. They also noted that other protective measures, such as lockdowns and closings of borders, schools and workplaces, require further research to fully assess their effectiveness in combating the epidemic. Based on the research conducted so far, no unambiguous conclusions can be made. This may be due to difficulties in research methodology, because the research carried out so far is not always fully reliable.

If hygiene rules are effective in protecting against both COVID-19 and other infections like seasonal flu, that doesn’t mean you don’t need to be vaccinated. Vaccinations provide the greatest protection against infectious diseases, both COVID-19 and influenza, although they do not always protect against the infection itself.

The study authors only indicated that vaccination against COVID-19 alone may not be sufficient to combat the epidemic. You should continue to follow hygiene rules, such as wearing face masks, staying away from cancer and caring for it after vaccination. These rules reduce the dose of viruses that we can be exposed to on social media. Thanks to this, the body can handle it better, especially when we are vaccinated and our immune system is better prepared for it. (PAP)

See also  Hospitals in Greater Manchester suspend non-urgent surgeries | UK News

Author: Zbigniew Wojtasiński

zbw / ekr /