This week, star-watchers will be able to see up to 25 shooting stars per hour flying across the night sky as the Orionid Meteor Shower launches its annual show.

These meteorites sneak across the sky every October, until November 7 – but the peak sightings are expected on Wednesday, October 21, around midnight.

This cosmic event occurs when Earth passes through a stream of debris left by Comet Halley – the main comet of the Orionid shower.

You should be able to see the falling stars from whatever direction you are looking at, but they will appear to come from the constellation Orion in the southeast.

Astronomers note that meteorites can move at a speed of 148,000 miles per hour in the atmosphere, but they leave gaseous traces in the sky that last for a few seconds.

NASA considers the Orionids to be one of the most beautiful showers of the year, which can be seen in the northern and southern hemispheres after midnight.

Stargazers are preparing to relish this month when hundreds of falling stars light up the sky during the Orionid meteor shower. In the photo it happened 2012

NASA recommends finding a dark area in the sky, away from street lights and other sources of light pollution, and preparing for a long wait.

It will be relatively easy to spot as long as the sky is clear and the weather is fine, but it may take some time before one appears bright enough to be detected.

Astronomers recommend lying flat on your back, with your feet facing southeast if you are in the Northern Hemisphere, and northeast if you are in the South.

NASA considers the Orionids to be one of the most beautiful showers of the year, which can be seen in the northern and southern hemispheres after midnight.  This shower was spotted in 2016

NASA considers the Orionids to be one of the most beautiful showers of the year, which can be seen in the northern and southern hemispheres after midnight. This shower was spotted in 2016

Then just “search”, taking as much of the sky as possible – it is better to use the naked eye rather than a telescope or binoculars to get a “wide view”.

The falling star volley consists of a stream of debris left by Comet Halley as it winds its way into the inner solar system and begins losing material through heating from the sun.

The core throws its icy and rocky dust into space, and as Earth passes through that scattered area of ​​debris, it leaves behind particles that fall through the atmosphere.

It’s a good year to watch the bright stars coincide with the moon in the rising crescent phase, which means it sets before midnight and provides a dark sky.

It’s not the strongest annual meteor showers, but you should see up to 25 hours per hour during the peak on October 21.

It’s extremely fast – reaching 41 miles per second and can be on the dim side – but it leaves a steady train of ionized gas that lasts for a few seconds and is easy to detect from the meteorite itself.

You can also have exceptionally bright splinters scattered through wider showers of faded shards, according to EarthSky.

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These meteorites sneak across the sky every October, from November 2-7 - but the peak sightings are expected on the morning of October 21.

These meteorites sneak across the sky every October, from November 2-7 – but the peak sightings are expected on the morning of October 21.

The Orionid meteor shower radiates from the constellation Orion – where its name also originates – as the annual shower is named for the point in our sky it appears to have come from.

They creep in all directions from that point – so you’ll see them anywhere in the sky – which is why it’s best to have a wide view.

To confirm if the shooting star is Orionid – follow its path backward and you might see it come from the Club of Orion – just north of Betelgeuse.

This month also brings a rare blue moon that will be visible in all time zones.

Astronomers note that meteorites can move at a speed of 148,000 miles per hour in the atmosphere, but they leave gaseous traces in the sky that last for a few seconds.  In the photo it happened in Russia from 2016

Astronomers note that meteorites can move at a speed of 148,000 miles per hour in the atmosphere, but they leave gaseous traces in the sky that last for a few seconds. In the photo it happened in Russia from 2016

There are expected to be approximately 25 meteor stars visible every hour from October 21 as the Orionids meteor shower peaks in the UK (stock image)

There are expected to be approximately 25 meteor stars visible every hour as of October 21 as the Orionids meteor shower peaks in the UK (stock image)

Our lunar neighbor will not shine blue, but the name is given because it is the second full moon to appear in the same month – the first will occur on October 1 and the next on October 31.

The cosmic parade occurs seven times every 19 years, which means that the world will not see the next show on October 31 until 2039.

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What makes this event even rarer is that it will appear worldwide for the first time since World War II.

People in North and South America will get a glimpse of a blue moon, along with those in India, Europe and Asia.

Explanation: The difference between a meteor, asteroid, and other space rocks

that asteroid It is a large piece of rock left over from collisions or the early Solar System. Most of it is located between Mars and Jupiter in the main belt.

a The culprit It is a rock covered with ice, methane and other compounds. Their orbits take them away from the solar system a lot.

a meteor It is what astronomers call a flash of light in the atmosphere when debris is burned.

This debris itself is known as A. meteor. Most of them are so small that they flow into the atmosphere.

If any of this meteorite reaches Earth, it is called a meteor.

Meteors, meteorites and meteorites usually originate from asteroids and comets.

For example, if the Earth passes through a comet’s tail, a lot of debris would burn in the atmosphere, causing meteors to fall.