Previous temperatures recorded pallor in the continuing heat on the northeastern coast of the United States.

The northwest coast of North America is facing a very severe heat wave. Temperatures in Oregon and Washington have risen 20-30 degrees Celsius above normal, and temperatures are expected to continue to rise, raising concerns about the effects on people’s lives and health, infrastructure and ecosystems.

Ben Knoll, a meteorologist at New Zealand’s National Water and Atmospheric Research Institute, reported over the weekend that Portland, Oregon, will be hotter than 99.9% of the rest of the planet on Sunday. “The only places that can get hotter are the deserts of Africa, the Persian Gulf, and the deserts of California.” – wrote on Twitter.

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Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington on Sunday recorded a record temperature of 40 degrees Celsius, far above the previous record of 33.3 degrees Celsius, which was set six years ago. The record was also broken by Portland International Airport, where thermometers showed more than 42 degrees Celsius. This is slightly higher than the previous high of 41.5 degrees Celsius, which was, however, 40 years ago. While the temperature on Sunday in Leighton, British Columbia, reached 46.6 degrees Celsius on Sunday, and 47.9 degrees Celsius on Monday, Tuesday’s 49.5 degrees Celsius is a historical record and one of the 40 degrees Celsius recorded in recent days in British Columbia.

According to the National Weather Service, this weekend’s heat wave was an “unprecedented event”, and extremely dangerous to the environment and people. “Extreme heat and humidity greatly increase the risk of heat-related illness, especially for people who work or participate in outdoor activities.”It was stated in the message. In the Greater Vancouver area, police reported there were at least 134 deaths in the three-day heat wave, most of them between the ages of 70 and 92, but sudden deaths from the heat also occurred in younger people. More than a dozen deaths from this have also been reported in Washington and Oregon.

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In addition to endangering health and life, the extremely high temperatures have also threatened the electricity supply — about 9,300 homes have lost electricity, and local electricity company Avesta Utilities said Tuesday afternoon that a city of more than 200,000 people would experience blackouts. Weather conditions also increased the risk of fires, and in northern California, the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office issued evacuation orders from the Chastina Lake and Juniper Valley areas.

The northwest coast of North America is facing a very severe heat wave. Temperatures in Oregon and Washington have risen 20-30 degrees Celsius above normal, and temperatures are expected to continue to rise, raising concerns about the effects on people’s lives and health, infrastructure and ecosystems.

Ben Knoll, a meteorologist at New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, reported over the weekend that Portland, Oregon, will be hotter than 99.9% of the rest of the planet on Sunday. “The only places that can get hotter are the deserts of Africa, the Persian Gulf, and the deserts of California.” – wrote on Twitter.

Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington on Sunday recorded a record temperature of 40 degrees Celsius, far above the previous record of 33.3 degrees Celsius, which was set six years ago. The record was also broken by Portland International Airport, where thermometers showed more than 42 degrees Celsius. This is slightly higher than the previous high of 41.5 degrees Celsius, which was, however, 40 years ago. While the temperature on Sunday in Leighton in British Columbia reached 46.6 degrees Celsius on Sunday, and 47.9 degrees Celsius on Monday, Tuesday’s 49.5 degrees Celsius is a historical record and one of the 40 degrees Celsius recorded in recent days in British Columbia.

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According to the National Weather Service, this weekend’s heat wave was an “unprecedented event”, and extremely dangerous to the environment and people. “Extreme heat and humidity greatly increase the risk of heat-related illness, especially for people who work or participate in outdoor activities.”It was stated in the message. In the Greater Vancouver area, police reported there were at least 134 deaths in the three-day heat wave, most of them between the ages of 70 and 92, but sudden deaths from heatwaves also occurred in younger people. More than a dozen deaths from this have also been reported in Washington and Oregon.

In addition to endangering health and life, unusually high temperatures have also threatened the electricity supply — about 9,300 homes have lost electricity, and local power company Avesta Utilities said Tuesday afternoon that a city of more than 200,000 people would experience blackouts. The weather also increased the risk of fires, and in northern California, the Siskiyou County Sheriff’s Office issued evacuation orders for the Chastina Lake and Juniper Valley areas.