Dr Amir Khan, head of the British Good Morning Program, has claimed that there is no “scientific basis” to warn the government against hugging the family at home on Christmas.

The doctor appeared on GMB today while being questioned by Kate Garraway and Ben Shephard about the new class restrictions and the five-day Christmas break.

On Thursday, the government confirmed 99% of the people It will be at level 2 or level 3 All indoor social gatherings are prohibited.

The new arrangements will take effect from 2 December after the end of the lockdown in England. Restrictions tightened after government scientific advisers warned that previous measures had not been sufficiently effective.

This comes after it was revealed that three families will be able to meet at Christmas for a five-day relaxation period in Covid, which is believed to be between December 23 and December 27.

During last night’s press conference, Professor Chris Whitty warned against “hugging or kissing” during the family relaxation at Christmas.


But Ben pointed out that being close to home for hours means that it does not matter if you are hugging your relatives because you are likely to transmit the virus regardless.

He said, “If you spent the whole day with your family and you were on top of them, and you had the opening lunch, you probably watched a little TV, sitting on the TV, I wouldn’t get why you couldn’t hug someone.

“The chances of transmitting anything, in terms of viruses, definitely occurred because you were both together for five hours. Why is hugging such a big problem?”

Dr. Amir replied: “You are absolutely right. The important thing is to know that opening up for Christmas for five days in homes is not necessarily a scientific decision, it is a more political decision.”

“So trying to balance that with the science will not work. You’re right – people in homes will breathe the same air as other people in that area. So it’s a difficult balance – there is no scientific basis for it. It’s more about human behavior and social decision-making.”

* Good Morning Britain airs on weekdays at 6 am on ITV

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