Some younger readers may not remember it anymore, but the beginning of the ’90s was still very wild… eastern Poland. Theft of cars and their equipment was a daily bread, poor statistics did not make a big impression on anyone. Thieves armed themselves with new security hacking equipment, and outdoor parking car owners also had to get creative. One of the ways to insure the car against theft was, for example, to stick a large word “Auto-Alarm” on a car that did not have one at all. There are also known cases of drivers – also from the outside – who left a piece of paper behind the glass with the inscription that there is nothing interesting in a particular car. For example, radios. Or something else of value (such as a spare wheel) and so that energy is generally not wasted breaking the lock or breaking the glass. Today, history is over, because in the face of the car crash disaster that California is battling, local drivers have come up with a similar solution.

Here, however, there is no question of writing information cards. And rightly, images can be assimilated much easier and faster. The picture is this: Increasingly, in California, you can find cars parked with their trunks open. No, not because someone forgot to lock their car. Not because the owner came home to bring something heavy and will be back soon. The goal is to show the potential thief that he will not find anything interesting here and that he should look for happiness elsewhere.

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Local police officers reply: “It’s illogical and dangerous.” It’s hard to disagree, because you can easily get in through the trunk and steal … the whole car. The best solution – argues the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) – is to report the theft/burglary immediately. This will not only increase the chances of catching the thief, but will also allow the mapping of “hot” locations where uniforms can increase their presence.