Nixon’s ambition was to keep the Republican Party in power for another quarter-century and eliminate political opponents. He established the President’s Reelection Commission, which officially handled his campaign, and in fact the dirty work, which Nixon knew all too well. The commission, chaired by former US Attorney John Mitchell, brought together people loyal to the president, tasked with carrying out a variety of illegal activities to harm Nixon’s political opponents. Call plumbers.

These are the plumbers – one who worked for the CIA until 1970, and for the past few months on the Presidential Committee – who have run into Watergate. Not only were professional listening devices found, but the phone numbers of a high-ranking White House employee were also found. He, in turn, worked with Nixon’s special advisor Charles Coulson.

Days after the break-in, Democratic National Committee Chairman O’Brien sued the president’s reelection committee, seeking $1 million in damages. He stated that “the facts clearly point to the White House,” and added, “We only discovered the attempted wiretapping because it was a failure. How many other trials and who was involved? I think we will witness the final test of this administration that, only four years ago, so hypocritically promised, ushering the country into a new era of law and order.

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